Tuesday, September 16, 2014

The Crossover

I have said before I don't love verse novels. Do you know what I love even less? Basketball. Not a  fan. Not even a little bit. With those two things working against it, I really didn't want to read The Crossover by Kwame Alexander. But it's getting a lot of award buzz so I finally (rather petulantly) picked up a copy. Ahem. This book is AMAZING. I loved it. This is why we should always stretch ourselves to read even those things that we don't think are "our type" of books.

Josh Bell
is my  name.
But Filthy McNasty is my claim to fame
Folks call me that
'cause my game's acclaimed,
so downright dirty, it'll put you to shame.
My hair is long, my height's tall.
See, I'm the next Kevin Durant, 
LeBron, and Chris Paul.

Josh's voice. It is so perfect. The book isn't entirely blank verse, as you can see from the above. It is a combination of several different styles and types, but what they all have in common is Josh's voice. His voice which is so real, vulnerable, confused, cocky, angry, resentful, giddy, and everything that is perfect 13 year old boy. Josh is a star basketball player, twin to another star basketball player, son of a former basketball Olympian and a middle school assistant principal, and an eighth grader. Through each poem that tells of the few months of Josh's 8th grade basketball season, the reader is given a clear picture of Josh and every detail of his life, thoughts, and feelings. Few words are used but reams of information and emotion are conveyed. I could read and read it over and over and always find new things to be in awed of. I wanted to read it again promptly upon finishing and I haven't experienced that urge in quite some time. It's blowing my mind that I experienced it over a verse novel about basketball.

The book is about basketball. There's a lot of basketball in it. It is also a story about brothers, change, and the power of family. But don't let anybody tell you it's not a sports book. It is. And you know what? Even if you're not a sports fan, it doesn't matter. Excellence is excellence, and this book is excellent. The basketball is essential and provides a great deal of the metaphor in the book, but it is also really, like all MG books, a story about growing up, facing change, and how one's relationships alter and are affected by growing up (particularly when members of the opposite sex are involved). Josh's twin, JB, has a girlfriend for the first time. He's less interested in basketball and doing things with Josh. Josh is angry. Their father is clearly suffering from heart problems but refuses to go to the doctor. Josh is worried. All of this is set against the backdrop of the basketball season. It's a short read, but a powerful one.

The prose is excellent in terms of imagery and evoking thoughts and feelings. For example:
The gym is a loud crowded circus.
My stomach is a roller coaster.
My head, a carousel..
The air, heavy with the smell
of sweat, popcorn,
and the sweet perfume 
of mother's watching sons.

I could quote so much, but then there would be no reason for you to go and find a copy of your own to read which you must do. Now.

5 comments:

  1. I find it so hard sometimes to jump out of my reading comfort zone, but I've been pleasantly surprised each time I do. I do like the prose of the snippet you gave. It does really bring up some lovely images.

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    1. I'm always pleasantly surprised to. I should do it more often. :)

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  2. You've made me really curious about this! I'm not a big fan of basketball but I did have basketball physical education classes in both college and high school. And I used to watch our college basketball team play. Seems like this would be a quick read because it's a novel in verse.

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    1. At least you've played it. I did everything I could to avoid even that.

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    2. Basketball is HUGE in the Philippines. It's the country's favorite sport. So I think almost everyone has either played it at some point or has watched it.

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