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Cybils 2015

The call for judges at The Cybils has gone out! If you love reading and discussing books for children and teens, this may be just the place for you.

Why apply?

You meet some truly wonderful people.
Truly. Interacting with fellow book lovers on Twitter, Tumblr, and through blog comments is the best thing about blogging. Being a Cybils judge exposes you to people you may not have encountered before and blogs that weren't on your radar. You get to have lovely and passionate discussions about books with these people while getting to know them. Even when I have not agreed with my fellow panelists on certain books or elements of a book, I have always enjoyed the discussion and how gracious everyone is.

You get to read a lot of books.
Book bloggers love books. If we didn't, we wouldn't do what we do. I've read books because they were nominated for the Cybils that I might never have read otherwise. And some of those books have become all time favorites. This is especially true if you are a Round One judge.

There's a category for every interest.
Picture books. Novels. Fiction. Non-Fiction. Poetry. Graphic Novels. There is a category for whatever your kidlit passion happens to be. There's even a Book App category.

If all of this sounds like something you would enjoy, and you are able to make a commitment to the work involved, head on over and apply. I've been an Elem/MG Spec Fic Round One judge the past two years, and I highly recommend the experience.

It's the 10th Birthday of the Cybils too! They have a gorgeous updated graphic too.

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